Because hallways and entryways were prone to drafts, they were lit with lanterns rather than exposed fixtures in the eighteenth-century United States. These special-purpose light fixtures continued to be referred to as "hall lanterns" even after they took on more elaborate forms. In these photographs, you can see a hall lantern that hung in the Morris-Jumel Mansion in the nineteenth century. A vasiiform glass tube surrounds the wick to protect the flame from drafts. The bell hung above the tube was designed to capture the smoke so that it would not stain the ceiling.
Hallway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, ca. 1887,
Hallway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, ca. 1887, from William H. Shelton, The Jumel Mansion (1916).
Hall lantern in the entryway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion,, ca. 1887.
Hall lantern in the entryway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion. Detail of a photograph, ca. 1887, from William H. Shelton, The Jumel Mansion (1916).
 


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