There is an enchanted weekend to come at the Morris-Jumel Mansion, with the last three performances of Vincent Carbone's adaptation of Alice in Wonderland. In this version of the well-known tale, the grounds of the mansion become Wonderland and the familiar characters take on American Revolutionary alter egos—the sleepy dormouse doubles as John Adams, for example. Visit the Morris-Jumel Mansion website for tickets. Performances are scheduled for tonight, Friday, and Saturday at 8 PM and Sunday, October 2, at 3 PM.
Photograph of the Morris-Jumel Mansion at night, lit by floodlights and a full moon.
A full moon to light Alice in Wonderland at the Morris-Jumel Mansion.
Photograph of shadows on the ceiling of the hallway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion.
A magical play of shadows on the hall ceiling during the tea party that follows performances of Alice in Wonderland at the Morris-Jumel Mansion.
 
 
Because hallways and entryways were prone to drafts, they were lit with lanterns rather than exposed fixtures in the eighteenth-century United States. These special-purpose light fixtures continued to be referred to as "hall lanterns" even after they took on more elaborate forms. In these photographs, you can see a hall lantern that hung in the Morris-Jumel Mansion in the nineteenth century. A vasiiform glass tube surrounds the wick to protect the flame from drafts. The bell hung above the tube was designed to capture the smoke so that it would not stain the ceiling.
Hallway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, ca. 1887,
Hallway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, ca. 1887, from William H. Shelton, The Jumel Mansion (1916).
Hall lantern in the entryway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion,, ca. 1887.
Hall lantern in the entryway of the Morris-Jumel Mansion. Detail of a photograph, ca. 1887, from William H. Shelton, The Jumel Mansion (1916).